Our homegrown veg are rubbish – but they’ve been an invaluable learning tool

We moved into a larger home earlier this year, one which has made it possible for us to finally have a go at producing our own veg.

I have tried to instil a sense of the natural world and how it relates to food in our older daughter in little ways here and there. She’s autistic and a very fussy eater, so I figure that we’ll try anything to get her to open up that reluctant mouth to give something new a chance.

As we’re clueless when it comes to gardening, we’ve made quite a number of mistakes this first year. We didn’t give our seedlings enough room, so none of them had a chance to grow properly. Our radishes were a total disaster, and we had to act to save the carrots, too. In addition, I don’t think our soil has been of the best quality, so we’ll know to feed our plants and nourish them a bit better in future.

Luckily my dad visited in time to save some of our lettuce seeds by repotting them, so we’ve had a nice mini crop growing at the back door.

However, as my main aim was not to feed the family but to educate our fussy miss, I think we can say it’s been a bit of a success. Earlier today, we collected some (tiny!) carrots and I set our daughter to task washing and prepping them for lunch.

She got stuck in – anything to occupy a wee person is invaluable in the school holidays – and we decided to prep a few of our salad leaves as well to make up a bowl to accompany her lunch of cheese sandwiches.

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I introduced her to salad cream (I am unapologetic about how much I love it) and tried to busy myself around the kitchen while she was eating so I could carry on pretending it was no big deal.

She ate the lot. Time will tell if it was a one-off novelty, but I am hoping not. On this evidence, the rubbish gardeners are going to carry on.

 

 

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